Monday, August 29, 2016

Pokhara

You can see Pokhara miles before the "Welcome to Pokhara" signs as the mountains that surround it can almost be seen from the Indian border. Pokhara is the tourists gateway to the Himalayas and appears a lot wealthier than other parts of the country because of this. Our faces sat pressed to the windows as we knew that behind the clouds was one of the best backgrounds in the world.

However, despite the majestic backdrop the stage ,Pokhara, itself is quite unimpressive. It is very touristy with hundreds of shops selling the same genuine fake "The North Face" products and new hotels sprouting up like beanstalks. After a brief drop into our hotel we had an orientation walk to the "Lakeside" which was the main tourist stretch. Pokhara was going to be our chance to just be tourists. At the far end we were approached by a old oriental woman who asked us to come to her shop. This is was something we got asked many time before and often ignored however when we saw that her shop was merely the contents of her rucksack we stayed a bit longer. In these parts of the world it's hard to believe stories. We are often brought up to assume street sellers are trying to rip us off. Equally, in this part of the world more people live in poverty and lead lives of extraordinary survival than we are used to back home. It's hard to know what to believe and really you just have to go with your gut. This woman explained that she came from a Tibetian village over the border and sells jewellery that her father had made there and we left with several bracelets each.

The next day we woke up to complete darkness, both because it was a power cut and we were getting up at 3am to watch the sunrise over the Himalayas. A romantic idea but it was pouring with rain so we weren't too optimistic, but not enough to actually go back to bed because missing it would be worse. Our early departure was due to the fact that traffic up to the view point is normally choc-a-bloc. However, due to the rain most people seemed to have opted for bed.

After parking the truck we went on a blind scramble up to the platform which was surrounded by small tea houses. Most of the tea houses had clicked on to the idea of offering a fee for tourists to go on their roof to get that extra 2m elevation. Just as we were thinking we were going to get to enjoy the free platform to ourselves we heard a bus load of other optimists descend upon us.

When the sun did rise we caught a glimpse of the Himalayas enveloped in clouds which actually made it more special than the perfect shot the brochures advertise. A group of women from Gujarat starting chanting a prayer in an attempt for the sun to come out. Alas, being the first to arrive we were okay with being the first to give up. The plan was to hike down the mountain and for some reason I remember our guide saying it would only take 20 minutes but 2.5 hours later we were at the bottom. Thanks to the cloud cover I didn't realise quite how high we were from the ground and I suddenly regretted by idea to skip breakfast.

The sun didn't appear until later that afternoon when we were due to go paragliding as if there is one place that you should go paragliding - it's the Himalayas. The mini-bus ride up the mountain was an adrenaline ride in itself as we got an idea of what real Nepalese driving was like when tourist comfort isn't priority. Minutes after getting off the bus we were already in the air where the briefing was used literally as we were told "When I say walk, walk. When I say run, run." As it was a tandem ride it really was that easy. The thought of running off a cliff is against all natural instinct you were already in the air before the edge so you couldn't really stop even if you wanted to. There wasn't a big adrenaline rush which I was expecting but in fact it was actually quite pleasant and relaxing - until we decided to do somersaults before landing.

Our last evening was spent drinking on a bar roof enjoying the last sunset in Pokhara before our bellies got talkative. There is a phenomenon when travelling in an unfamiliar country when you start to crave those familiar carbohydrates and bland sauces. So continuing our touristy binge we had dinner at a popular westernised restaurant and were happy to have some pizza and our first 'Everest' beer to wash it down.